Google Cloud Console

  • Google Cloud Console is a web admin interface to manage your Google cloud infrastructure.

Features

  • You can create projects on Google Cloud Console.
  • With Cloud Console, you can quickly find and check the health of all your cloud resources in one place, including virtual machines, network settings, and data storage.
  • Logging
    • Manage and audit user access to project resources.
    • Track down production issues quickly by viewing logs.
  • You can explore the Google Cloud Marketplace and launch cloud solutions with just a few clicks.
  • Billing
    • View a detailed billing breakdown of your bills.
    • Set spending budgets to avoid unexpected surprises
  • Cloud Console enables you to connect to your virtual machines via Cloud Shell. You can quickly handle admin tasks using this instant-on Linux machine equipped with your favorite tools including Google Cloud SDK preconfigured and authenticated.

Pricing

  • Cloud Console is available at no cost to Google Cloud Platform customers.
IT Certification Category (English)728x90

Validate Your Knowledge

Question 1

Your company just deployed a major version release of its web application to Google App Engine. A few hours later, users started reporting a critical issue with the latest release. You decided to quickly revert back to the previous version of the application while your team is investigating the issue.

What should you do?

  1. Use the Cloud Console to go to the App Engine Versions page. Reroute 100% of the traffic to the previous working version of the application.
  2. On the Cloud Shell, execute the command gcloud components restore.
  3. Use the Cloud Console to go to the App Engine Versions page. Choose the previous web application version to split the traffic between the current and previous versions.
  4. Deploy the working version of your web app as a separate application. Go to App Engine settings and configure the application to route 100% of the traffic to the original version.

Correct Answer: 1

Traffic migration on App Engine switches the request routing between the versions within a service of your application, moving traffic from one or more versions to a single new version.

To migrate traffic in App Engine using the Cloud Console, go to the Versions page:

  1. Select the version to which you want to migrate 100% of the traffic.
  2. Click Migrate traffic.
  3. Optional: When warmup requests are enabled, your traffic is migrated gradually.
  4. To migrate traffic immediately, select the option under the Show advanced options section.

Hence, the correct answer is: Use the Cloud Console to go to the App Engine Versions page. Reroute 100% of the traffic to the previous working version of the application.

The option that says: On the Cloud Shell, execute the command gcloud components restore is incorrect because this command is only used to revert Cloud SDK installation to its previous state and not for migrating traffic in App Engine.

The option that says: Use the Cloud Console to go to the App Engine Versions page. Choose the previous web application version to split the traffic between the current and previous versions is incorrect because this does not satisfy the requirement to revert the application back to the previous version. While splitting the traffic to the previous version will get some users to access the previous version, other users will still be routed to the version with a critical issue that does not solve the problem.

The option that says: Deploy the working version of your web app as a separate application. Go to App Engine settings and configure the application to route 100% of the traffic to the original version is incorrect because it is redundant to deploy the previous version again as a separate application. The previous version is already available on the App Engine Versions page so there is no need to deploy again and split the traffic to the newly uploaded application.

References:
https://cloud.google.com/appengine/docs/standard/python/migrating-traffic
https://cloud.google.com/appengine/docs/standard/python/splitting-traffic

Note: This question was extracted from our Google Certified Associate Cloud Engineer Practice Exams.

Question 2

You built an application and deployed it to the Google Cloud Platform. This application needs to connect to a licensing server that you plan to host on Compute Engine. You configure the application to connect to the licensing server on the 10.146.0.17 IP address. You intend to keep this setting intact to avoid manually reconfiguring the application.

What should you do?

  1. Using the Cloud Console, create a Compute Engine instance. Configure the Primary internal IP as a static internal IP address and set it to 10.146.0.17.
  2. Using the Cloud Console, create a Compute Engine instance. Configure the External IP as a static IP address and set it to 10.146.0.17.
  3. Do not assign an IP while creating the licensing server on Compute Engine to automatically get an ephemeral internal IP address.
  4. Start the licensing server with an automatically generated ephemeral IP address. Afterward, promote it to a static external IP address set to 10.0.146.0.17.

Correct Answer: 1

Static internal IPs provide the ability to reserve internal IP addresses from the IP range configured in the subnet, then assign those reserved internal addresses to resources as needed. Reserving an internal IP address takes that address out of the dynamic allocation pool and prevents it from being used for automatic allocations. Reserving static internal IP addresses requires specific IAM permissions so that only authorized users can reserve a static internal IP address.

With the ability to reserve static internal IP addresses, you can always use the same IP address for the same resource even if you have to delete and recreate the resource.

We need to make sure that the configuration of the application connecting to the licensing server does not change. Moreover, the IP assigned to an instance is a private IP address used for internal networking. This means that reserving a static internal IP is the best option.

Tutorials Dojo Study Guide and Cheatsheet

Hence the correct answer is: Using the Cloud Console, create a Compute Engine instance. Configure the Primary internal IP as a static internal IP address and set it to 10.146.0.17.

The option that says: Using the Cloud Console, create a Compute Engine instance. Configure the External IP as a static IP address and set it to 10.146.0.17. is incorrect because 10.146.0.17 is not an external IP address but an internal IP address that belongs to the private IP address range advised by Google.

The option that says: Do not assign an IP while creating the licensing server on Compute Engine to automatically get an ephemeral internal IP address is incorrect because an ephemeral address lasts only until a VM is running. Once the VM is stopped or needs to be recreated, the new VM will use a new ephemeral IP which will force you to change the IP configured on the application.

The option that says: Start the licensing server with an automatically generated ephemeral IP address. Afterward, promote it to a static external IP address 10.0.146.0.17 is incorrect. You don’t need a static external IP address since the IP 10.0.146.0.17 belongs to a private subnet. What you need is a static internal IP address instead.

References:
https://cloud.google.com/compute/docs/ip-addresses#reservedaddress
https://cloud.google.com/vpc/docs/ip-addresses

Note: This question was extracted from our Google Certified Associate Cloud Engineer Practice Exams.

For more Google Cloud practice exam questions with detailed explanations, check out the Tutorials Dojo Portal:

Google Certified Associate Cloud Engineer Practice Exams

Reference:
https://cloud.google.com/cloud-console

Pass your AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Certifications with the Tutorials Dojo Portal

Tutorials Dojo portal

Our Bestselling AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate Practice Exams

AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate Practice Exams

Enroll Now – Our AWS Practice Exams with 95% Passing Rate

AWS Practice Exams Tutorials Dojo

Enroll Now – Our Azure Certification Exam Reviewers

azure reviewers tutorials dojo

Enroll Now – Our Google Cloud Certification Exam Reviewers

Tutorials Dojo Exam Study Guide eBooks

Tutorials Dojo Study Guide and Cheat Sheets-2

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

Tutorials Dojo YouTube Channel

FREE Intro to Cloud Computing for Beginners

FREE AWS, Azure, GCP Practice Test Samplers

Browse Other Courses

Generic Category (English)300x250

Recent Posts

AWS, Azure, and GCP Certifications are consistently among the top-paying IT certifications in the world, considering that most companies have now shifted to the cloud. Earn over $150,000 per year with an AWS, Azure, or GCP certification!

Follow us on LinkedIn, YouTube, Facebook, or join our Slack study group. More importantly, answer as many practice exams as you can to help increase your chances of passing your certification exams on your first try!

View Our AWS, Azure, and GCP Exam Reviewers

Our Community

~98%
passing rate
Around 95-98% of our students pass the AWS Certification exams after training with our courses.
200k+
students
Over 200k enrollees choose Tutorials Dojo in preparing for their AWS Certification exams.
~4.8
ratings
Our courses are highly rated by our enrollees from all over the world.

What our students say about us?

error: Content is protected !!